-------------------------------------------TERIMA KASIH SUDI DATANG KE BLOG SAYA ;D-------------------------------------------
-----------------------YANG MANA ELOK JADIKAN PANDUAN, YANG MANA BURUK JADIKAN TAULADAN ;D-----------------------
--------------------------------SALAM KASIH & SAYANG, LOTFI-SARAH-KHALYSH-KEISHA-KASHIF--------------------------------

Friday, January 29, 2010

Nak mengandung kerrrrr... ? Part 1/2


Hahaha tittle xhengat....jgn mara...huhuuu
Sesaje browsing for tips... :)
For those yg planning to get pregnant...
Meh akak tolong address kan...do & donts :)
Kalau bleh yg merancang nak mengandung tuh...
Biarlah dlm keadaan minda & fizikal sihat yg bersedia...
Kalau bole xnak la accident2...tekojut! haih...
Tetiber doc scan dah kuar kaki tgn suma haih per crita tuh...
Hahaha mmg sah!
Tapi kalau dah "teeeer oopochot!" jugak tu...
Terima lah seREDHAnya...Alhamdulillah...
Rezeki dari Allah... :)

For me masa 1st pregnancy dulu...
Gila duk pedooor....
3 bulan sebelum conceive...
Jaga makan, jaga kesihatan...
xamik kafein...junk food o r wut so ever...
Serba serbi lah...hahaha...
So nanti kan.... chewaaah nanti tu...
For the 2nd one...biarlah persediaan nya...
Sama mcm 1st one dulu... :)
Health must be in tip top condition...
Supaya baby nnt pun sehat... :)
Insyaallah...

So here are the list...

------------------------------------------------------------------
20 things you should do before you try to get pregnant
Reviewed by the BabyCenter Medical Advisory Board
------------------------------------------------------------------

You and your partner have decided to take the plunge into parenthood. But wait just one second — or a month or two, at least. To give yourself the best chance for a healthy pregnancy and a healthier baby, there are a few important things you need to do before you head down the road to conception. Our list will help you get your life and body into baby-making shape.

1) Highlights Fuel up on folic acid (okeh checked :p )
------------------------------------------------------------
Even if you do manage to eat a balanced diet, it can be difficult to get all of the nutrients you need from food alone — and there's one in particular you don't want to skimp on at this point. By taking 400 micrograms of folic acid a day for at least one month before you start trying and during your first trimester, you can cut your chances of having a baby with neural-tube defects such as spina bifida by up to 70 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

You can buy folic acid supplements in the drugstore or you can take a prenatal or regular multivitamin. If you do take a multivitamin, make sure it doesn't contain more than the recommended daily allowance of 770 mcg RAE (2,565 IU) of vitamin A, unless it's all in a form called beta-carotene. Getting too much of a certain kind of vitamin A can cause birth defects.

If you're unsure about what to take, ask your healthcare provider to recommend a supplement.

.
.
.

2) Just say no to partying (party tupperware aci tak? ;p)
------------------------------------------------------------
If you smoke or take drugs, now's the time to stop, because some drugs can stay in your system even after their effects have worn off. Numerous studies have shown that smoking and taking drugs can lead to miscarriage, premature birth, and low-birthweight babies.

Plus, research suggests that any tobacco use can affect your fertility and lower your partner's sperm count. In fact, studies have shown that even secondhand smoke may affect your chances of getting pregnant.

Alcohol also can get in the way of getting pregnant, so it's a good idea to cut back when you start trying and to abstain during the last two weeks of your cycle in case you've conceived.
.
.
.

3) Give that cup of joe the heave-ho (im trying...to decaf ;p)
------------------------------------------------------------
Research shows that too much caffeine can reduce your ability to absorb iron, which you'll need plenty of for pregnancy, and increase your risk for stillbirth — so start weaning yourself off of coffee, tea, and colas or switch to decaf.

You might want to start by switching to a half-decaf, half-caffeinated drink, because going cold turkey may cause nasty headaches. If you're a real java junkie, try cutting back to a cup a day — most experts think that amount is safe. Once you've acclimated to life with little or no caffeine, you may find that steamed milk with a shot of flavored syrup is a nice coffee substitute — and the calcium will do your body good.
.
.
.

4) Get your weight in check (ok checked, BMI normal ;))
------------------------------------------------------------
f you're a healthy weight, you'll probably have an easier time conceiving. Studies show that women whose body mass index (BMI) is below 20 or above 30 have a harder time getting pregnant, so it's a good idea to try to get yourself into the 20 to 30 range before you start trying. Click here to figure out your BMI.

If you're not in a healthy range, losing or gaining weight may give you the boost you need to conceive. Talk to your healthcare provider about the best way to achieve your weight goals.
.
.
.

5) Stock your fridge with healthy foods (ok papa jom p K4...! ;p)
------------------------------------------------------------
You're not eating for two yet, but you should start making nutritious food choices now so that your body will be stocked up with the nutrients you need for a healthy pregnancy. Try to get at least 2 cups of fruit and 2 1/2 cups of vegetables every day as well as plenty of whole grains and foods that are high in calcium, like milk, calcium-fortified orange juice, and yogurt.

If you're a big fan of fish, start watching your intake. Although fish is an excellent source of protein, certain kinds, such as shark, swordfish, king mackerel, and tilefish, tend to contain too much methyl mercury, which can be harmful to your baby's growing brain in high doses. Because mercury can accumulate in your body and linger there for more than a year, it's best to avoid high-mercury fish while you're trying to conceive. Instead, eat about two servings (12 ounces) of lower-mercury fish such as salmon and canned light tuna a week.
.
.
.

6) Create and follow an exercise program (naik turun tangga rumah ;p)
------------------------------------------------------------
Start and stick to a fitness plan now, and you'll be rewarded with a healthy body that's fit for pregnancy. Plus, working up a little sweat is a great way to relieve the stress that can get in the way of getting pregnant.

A healthy exercise program includes 60 minutes of activity, such as walking or cycling and weight training, on most days of the week. To increase flexibility, add exercise such as daily stretching or yoga, and you'll have a really well-rounded fitness program. Once you're pregnant, remember that it's okay — even recommended — to continue exercising.

If your idea of working out is clicking the buttons on the TV remote, you'll need to ease into an exercise routine. Start with something tame, like walking ten to 20 minutes a day. Add more activity into your daily routine by taking the stairs instead of the elevator or parking your car a few blocks away from work.
.
.
.

7) See your dentist (maaak...aatuuut! dokter gigi uwaa!)
------------------------------------------------------------
When you're getting yourself into baby-making shape, don't forget about your oral health. Hormonal shifts during pregnancy can make you more susceptible to gum disease. Increased progesterone and estrogen levels can cause the gums to react differently to the bacteria in plaque, resulting in swollen, bleeding, tender gums.

The good news is that women who take care of their periodontal health before they get pregnant cut down on their chances of experiencing gum complications in pregnancy. See your dentist for a checkup and a cleaning now if you haven't done so in the last six months.

.
.
.

8) Get in touch with your medical roots (so far so good... ;))
------------------------------------------------------------
It's a good idea for you and your partner to investigate your family health history, so call your parents, siblings, or other relatives to get the medical scoop. If they get suspicious and you're not ready to share your news, tell them you're trying out a new healthcare provider.

The most important thing to ask about is whether anyone in your family has any genetic or chromosomal disorders like Down syndrome, sickle cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs disease, or bleeding disorders. You'll also want to find out if any relatives have mental retardation or other developmental delays or were born with an anatomical birth defect, like a cardiac or neural-tube defect.

Your practitioner will ask you a series of questions at your preconception visit or first prenatal checkup, and your answers will help determine whether specific prenatal tests should be recommended, or if you or your partner should consider genetic testing before you even start trying.
.
.
.
9) Schedule a preconception visit (Pap smear? eeerk...)
------------------------------------------------------------
You don't have to have a doctor or midwife lined up yet to deliver your baby, but you should set up an appointment now with your regular healthcare provider for a preconception checkup. Your practitioner probably will ask you about your personal and family medical history, your present health, and any medications you're taking. Some drugs, such as Accutane, a commonly prescribed acne medication, are stored in your body's fat and can linger there for months.

Your doctor should also discuss diet, weight, and exercise with you; recommend a prenatal vitamin; make sure you're up to date on your immunizations; test you for immunity to childhood diseases such as chicken pox and rubella; and answer any questions you have. If it's been a year since you had a checkup, you can also expect to have a pelvic exam and a pap smear, and to be tested for sexually transmitted diseases if you're at risk.

Many couples may also want to pursue genetic testing for sickle cell disease, Tay-Sachs, cystic fibrosis, or other disease based on their ethnic background or family history. For more information on what to expect at a preconception visit, click here.
.
.
.

10) Figure out when you ovulate (ok dah dload FEMTA ;p)
------------------------------------------------------------
Some women simply stop using birth control when they're ready to get pregnant and let fate decide when they'll conceive. Others take a more calculated approach by pinpointing their ovulation day.

Use our ovulation calculator to get a rough estimate. If you want to be more exact, start charting your basal body temperature (BBT) and the changes in your cervical mucus. Tracking these symptoms over several months can help you figure out when you're ovulating during each cycle. To get a precise temperature reading, you'll need to check yours the first thing in the morning, before getting out of bed, using a special basal thermometer that's available at drugstores.

Ovulation predictor kits can also help you figure out when you're ovulating by detecting hormones in your urine, or changes in chloride in the saliva or on the skin, that signal ovulation is about to occur. These kits can be pretty pricey, $20 to $50 per cycle, and are available at drugstores.


TO BE CONTINUED... :)

1 comment:

  1. hmm,saye yg no 2 ni..teropocot la jg..haha.tp terima ngan tgn terbuka..:).harap no 3 nnti,bersedia lebih skit..hehe

    ReplyDelete